Helping Saudi Arabia bomb Yemen is not a plan for peace

Helping Saudi Arabia bomb Yemen is not a plan for peace

The most plausible route to ending Yemen’s civil war and, in Pompeo’s words, “ensur[ing] a just peace,” is not to stay the course in supporting the Saudi coalition, as the secretary of state recommends. It is to end Washington’s backing for a catastrophic intervention which was never ours to fight. Continuing to help the Saudi war effort is a fool’s errand with cruel consequences for Yemeni civilians and no benefits for the United States.

America’s allies in Europe are sandbagging Uncle Sam

America’s allies in Europe are sandbagging Uncle Sam

Despite much pushing and prodding from Washington, NATO remains an organization treading water on the backs of the American taxpayer. As the recently published annual NATO report shows, only seven of NATO’s 29 members meet the alliance’s 2 percent of GDP benchmark. Sixteen countries  have no plan (and are on no trajectory) to meet their spending obligations, a development that exhibits complete disregard for Article 3 of the NATO charter and disrespects the entire concept of shared responsibilities under an alliance. Indeed, despite having the financial resources to invest and prepare their own militaries for the emerging period of great power conflict, the vast majority of Europe remains far more comfortable outsourcing security responsibilities to Washington.

Trump’s defense plan is costly, ineffective, and hollows out our economic and military power

Trump’s defense plan is costly, ineffective, and hollows out our economic and military power

Like all countries, the United States lives in a world with finite resources. We are still the wealthiest, most secure country on the planet. Rather than compounding our fiscal challenges by papering over them with even more borrowing and spending, the federal government should rethink U.S. grand strategy. We should abandon peripheral missions and focus on strengthening our nation and our military.

Trump aside, what's the U.S. role in NATO

Trump aside, what's the U.S. role in NATO

America had an enduring interest in ensuring that the Continent not fall under the domination of a single, capable, hostile power: That could pose a serious threat to America. The Truman administration was clear on this point: The main purpose of stationing American military forces in Europe in the early 1950s was to stay long enough to right the balance of power, not to stay forever.

Time to End the Endless War in Afghanistan

Time to End the Endless War in Afghanistan

If President Trump was serious about transitioning the U.S. out of endless wars, he would end the war in Afghanistan and pull out all U.S. forces. The United States can protect our people, defend the homeland, and snuff out transnational terrorists without stationing American soldiers in Afghanistan forever. Anything less is more of the same and will only prolong an extravagantly expensive and utterly discredited strategy.

End Washington’s stagnant Afghanistan project

End Washington’s stagnant Afghanistan project

So little has changed in eight years that Paul and Udall this week introduced legislation which nearly could be copied verbatim from their 2011 push for withdrawal because it’s up against the same stale commitment to permanent intervention. The 2019 American Forces Going Home After Noble (AFGHAN) Service Act has updated numbers—higher counts of U.S. troops killed or wounded in Afghanistan, and a larger tally of borrowed tax dollars spent and often wasted—but its core demand of a quick and responsible exit from the longest war in U.S. history is unaltered.

Tangible moves to peace

Tangible moves to peace

With President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un two weeks away from their second summit in eight months, many journalists, pundits, and experts have focused on the question of what nuclear concessions the U.S. will secure. But there is a bigger story for those willing to see it: After nearly seven decades of mutual distrust, the U.S. and North Korea could find a way to coexist peacefully. In the grand scheme of things, this is the objective that will determine whether current diplomacy can be labeled as a success.

Why the chance of an ISIS resurgence makes the case for Syria withdrawal stronger

Why the chance of an ISIS resurgence makes the case for Syria withdrawal stronger

Only naivete could deny the possibility of some ISIS resurgence or evolution in the wake of U.S. departure from Syria. That should go without saying. But since the possibility has been raised, it should be seen as an indictment of our existing strategy and an impetus to change course. It certainly does not justify prolonging U.S. entanglement in Syria’s civil war.

Re-evaluating the U.S.-Saudi relationship

Re-evaluating the U.S.-Saudi relationship

Despite what the Trump administration says, Saudi Arabia is not an
ally. When national security interests coincide, Washington should
cooperate with the Saudis as it would with any country that shares
similar goals. But when those interests diverge, Washington should
show the courage to go its own way. American leaders must make it
clear that United States support is not an entitlement.

Trump's right about Afghanistan and the Middle East – 'Everybody’s tired' of America's endless wars

Trump's right about Afghanistan and the Middle East – 'Everybody’s tired' of America's endless wars

The president rightly decried the ludicrous suggestion from some Senate Republicans that ending U.S. intervention in Afghanistan and Syria would be “precipitous,” listing in compelling terms the high price in blood and treasure these lengthy – and in many ways futile – conflicts have exacted. But elsewhere in his State of the Union speech, Trump’s message was rather more muddled. We’re leaving these endless wars, the president said – but we’re staying, too, and we just might escalate again, including against new targets like Iran